Two books, one story: @burgewords reviews @RodneyCroome on #MarriageEquality

IN every writer’s life there comes a time when a piece written by someone else renders our own contribution unnecessary. After exploring the issue of marriage equality in my country for more than a decade, Rodney Croome’s new book has finally done this for me. From This Day Forward: Marriage Equality in Australia is an aggregation of Croome’s major writing on the marriage equality debate to date, including updates on his 2010 contribution to Why Vs. Why: Bill Muehlenberg and Rodney Croome debate Gay Marriage (Pantera Press). But Croome’s collection is much more that; it’s the best document Australia has to move the debate – finally – into legislation. The […]

Memoir reveals the heart of @RobOakeshott1: review by @SandraC81413369

ROB Oakeshott’s recently published memoir is an entertaining and insightful recollection of his vital role in giving supply and confidence to the minority Labor Government, and his part in the progress of major legislation between 2010 and 2013. His push for parliamentary and education reform and a price on carbon during this period will be familiar to many readers, but his book also sheds light on the less well known details of the negotiations behind the agreement with Prime Minister Julia Gillard and the workings of the 43rd Parliament while Oakeshott served as Independent Member for the NSW electorate of Lyne. He finds some answers with the voice and growing influence of the new media. Integral to […]

Cory’s book: Part 3 of a blow-by-blow fact check series by @adropex

By Lesley Howard @adropex 30th January 2014 Cory Bernardi opens the third chapter of his book, The Conservative Revolution, by stating the obvious: that children learn from their home environment and the people directly around them, generally through observation and participation; the better the environment and the role models, the better the lessons the child will carry through to adulthood. However, Bernardi is adamant that the most favourable environment to be that of the “traditional” family, comprised of the biological father and the biological mother, who are both the moral teachers and role models to their children. Interestingly, Bernardi makes no mention of the traditional role of grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins […]

Cory’s manifesto: Book review by Lola Montgomery @lolathevamp

By Lola Montgomery  @lolathevamp 24th January 2014 The Conservative Revolution hit the internet in a storm of outright criticism. Twitter was awash with Senator Cory Bernardi. The book became the Australian political punching bag of Amazon.com, with mock reviews serving as comedic outlet for many citizens’ frustration with the current Australian government. The reviewers mostly admitted not having read the book, nor wanting to, and ranged in content from the point of view of a dachshund to a recommendation that the pages be best used as lining for the birdcage. No Fibs put out a call for someone to actually buy, read and review the book, and for some reason, this […]

Cory’s book: Part 2 of a blow-by-blow fact check series by @adropex

[clear] [clear] By Lesley Howard @adropex 19 January 2014 In Chapter 2 “The First Pillar: Faith” Bernardi presents a strong and considered study of the historical contribution Christianity has made to Australia’s national development and how this heritage is represented in the laws and moral codes of Australian society today. Bernardi proposes that faith is fundamental to a healthy and hopeful society and provides the “common thread through which our laws, our instinct and our social fabric are entwined.” Faith provides us with a set of values, moral guidelines in which we can trust and a framework for decision-making. Bernardi goes on to discuss how he believes individuals develop faith. Some people […]

Cory Bernardi’s ideology: @stewarthase book review

By Stewart Hase  @stewarthase 15 January 2014 The Conservative Revolution was worth reading for two main reasons. The first is that it gives a very clear view into the mind of the extreme Christian conservative. The reader gets to see the thinking, the ideology that drives the political agenda of people like Cory Bernardi. Thus, it is not difficult to extrapolate the type of policies that that politicians of this mind-set will pursue. The second thing I got out of this book is probably based more on my background as an academic and scientist than anything else. It was interesting to read something that purports to provide an argument, that has […]

Cory’s book: Part 1 of a blow-by-blow fact check series by @adropex

By Lesley Howard @adropex 13 January 2014 Intro: in part one of a @NoFibs series, Lesley Howard examines and fact-checks the preface and Chapter 1 of Cory Bernardi’s book The Conservative Revolution. A lot has been said in recent days about Cory Bernardi and about statements he makes in his book The Conservative Revolution.  It seems that Bernardi’s stand on certain issues has, at the very least, inspired controversy and for some, outright disgust. Looking at mainstream and social media reports it would appear that Bernardi has many detractors and that if he has any supporters they have been noticeable by their silence. It also appears that some of the critics have not […]

Labor’s downfall: @mattyhoran review of @apatrickafr book

By Matthew Horan @mattyhoran No Fibs political books reviewer 13 November, 2013 It’s hard to read Aaron Patrick’s Downfall – How the Labor Party ripped itself apart and not make comparisons with the ultimately disappointing The Stalking of Julia Gillard. Kerry-Anne Walsh’s book canvassed much the same period and will now be turned into a mini-series starring Rachel Griffith – and it’s a shame, because Patrick’s book is the better, and more incisive, read. Patrick, a Financial Review journalist, brings an intimate knowledge of events to bear, not least because as a former Young Labor activist he was close to new Labor leader Bill Shorten in the early ‘90s. Written before the […]

Breaking News: Sex, Lies and the Murdoch Succession by Paul Barry

By Margaret O’Connor 1 November 2013 If you want a quick and telling glimpse of the psychopathology that infested Rupert Murdoch’s power house tabloid News of the World (NoTW), turn to the Leveson Inquiry Hearings for Wednesday, 29 November, 2011. On that day, Paul McMullan, ex-NoTW reporter, reluctantly gave testimony about his work practices there – and, in defence of his and his colleagues’ calculated violations of others’ rights to personal space and boundaries, became globally famous for his take on the concept of privacy, proclaiming ‘privacy is for paedos….privacy is evil…..it allows (people) to do bad things.’ Then in response to this, Counsel to the Inquiry, Robert jay QC,  asks […]

The New Front Page: @YaThinkN reviews @timdunlop book

By Noely Neate 25 July 2013 Source: Yathink.com.au   As a punter, books written on media – particularly ones based on the relationship between traditional media institutions and the internet – fascinate me. I don’t want to be a journalist as I am quite happy in my small business, but I am an avid devourer of news who happens to work in the IT industry.  I include this disclaimer before discussing Tim Dunlop’s book, “The New Front Page: New Media and the Rise of the Audience” to make it clear that I am not a media insider. I am the ‘Audience’ Mr Dunlop refers to. I see on Twitter the awful […]