Australia invaded Iraq by deceiving Australian people: 43 Australian elders

‘We must return stable, predictable, AND honest government to Australia.‘  Joe Hockey, May 23, National Press Club By Margo Kingston May 23, 2013 When I saw Paul Barratt’s tweets today on some momentous big Howard government lies, I remembered this letter, which Barratt signed in 2004. The government’s trashing of the elders who signed it triggered the […]

Ethics overboard: How to promote integrity in the moment of choice

By Margo Kingston January 14, 2003 MARGO: With all the talk about stronger shield laws for journos, I think we are edging ever closer to needing an answer to the question: What is a journalist? We cannot argue for special protections and exemptions from privacy laws unless we can distinguish ourselves from non-journalists. To me the […]

The Skull Beneath the Skin

By Margo Kingston 10 May 2013 In his Cry, Freedom speech this week, Shadow Attorney General George Brandis said this: ‘But at least the debates about freedom of speech and freedom of the press, which we have seen in the past couple of years, have been a sharp reminder to the Liberal Party of its historic […]

The Forgotten People

By Margo Kingston May 9, 2013 The day after Howard, Abbott and Brandis, among other Liberals, pulverised our freedoms for George Bush, they did it again for Chinese President Hu. This chapter of my book is Part 5 in our series of memory joggers for shadow Attorney General George Brandis, in the hope that he revises his recent […]

MSM outrage-shaming: What’s it all about?

By Alison Parkes May 8, 2013 This piece is written in response to these three articles which have appeared within the past couple of weeks 1)  Hooked on outrage in the Twitter wars  by Jacqueline Maley, 20 April Fairfax 2)  The left takes a turn for the ugly as power slips through Labor’s grasp by Chris Johnson, […]

A day in the life of Our House under siege

By Margo Kingston May 8, 2013 Margo: In this chapter from my book, I detail the unprecedented mauling of press, parliamentary and citizen’s freedom in Parliament by Howard when George Bush came to Canberra in 2003. Brandis was in the thick of it, and made no protest. My contemporaneous report of the events is Parliament meets Bush: A […]

Community Cabinet: Policy sounding without the press gallery fury, froth and bubble

By Kevin Rennie April 20, 2013 Source:  Labor View from Bayside There were quite a few surprises at Julia Gillard’s Community Cabinet on 17 April 2013, hosted by Norwood Secondary College in Melbourne’s eastern suburb of Ringwood. Cabinet members held one-on-one interviews before a public forum that lasted over an hour. The government school is in […]

@Barnaby_Joyce states the case for Labor’s media merger ‘public interest test’: How will the Nats vote?

By Margo Kingston March 17, 2013 The National Party has long opposed further media domination by Rupert Murdoch, as detailed in the two media policy chapters in my book. It fought against John Howard’s weakening of media concentration laws to facilitate Murdoch expansion, and Barnaby Joyce actually crossed the floor in 2006 to vote for his […]

Last chance to rein in Murdoch

By Margo Kingston March 16, 2013 Here’s a history lesson on the long road to media dominance by Rupert Murdoch, aided by both big parties, via two chapters in my book. The Liberals said yes to Murdoch under Howard, and will keep saying yes. They are partners, or rather, Abbott is Murdoch’s puppet. I also tell the […]

Media reform laws address abuses of long-fought for freedoms

By Matt da Silva (@mattdasilva) March 15th, 2013 Source:Happy Antipodean In a useful run-down on his blog, journalism law academic Mark Pearson outlines some objections to the government’s proposed media reform legislation. It is a little brief and although it starts out promisingly, political concerns quickly rush to the fore. Here’s his first objection, near the top: […]