#AusVotes Day 36 – Combative climate change policy: @qldaah #qldpol

David Marler

David Marler

Queensland reporter at No Fibs
David is a full time carer for his son and in quiet times contributes to NoFibs. More at: https://nofibs.com.au/meeting-david-marler-nofibs-twitter-activist-by-griffithelects
David Marler
- 1 hour ago
David Marler
https://nofibs.com.au/meeting-david-marler-nofibs-twitter-activist-by-griffithelects

May 16, 2019 – Table of contents

Jeremy Miller is running to win Lyne

A student and first time voter in Higgins

Twisted Sister, Clive Palmer copyright infringement case

Standing with a nervous nation that still believes

Follow up to yesterday’s negative gearing discussion

Campbell Newman sized cuts to hit federal public service

Senator Bridget McKenzie sees climate action hoax

Scott Morrison gives final pitch at NPC

Bill Shorten rallies with a “vote for change” speech

Australia’s combative political history over climate change policy

Coalition agreement breached

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Jeremy Miller is running to win Lyne

In the latest episode of the No Fibs podcast Margo Kingston meets Jeremy Miller in person to catch up on how his campaign as an Independent candidate for Lyne has progressed.” Jeremy Miller is running to win Lyne.

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A student and first time voter in Higgins

Lesley Howard reports, “Imi is 18 and a first-time federal election voter. She is currently completing Year 12 and is studying Australian Politics for VCE. She will be voting in the inner metropolitan seat of Higgins, in Melbourne.” A student and first time voter in Higgins.

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Twisted Sister, Clive Palmer copyright infringement case

One of Clive Palmer’s advertisements that has bombarded Australians from the start of this year was a rework of the Twisted Sister song, “We’re not gonna take it”, the band has claimed.

Dee Snider says the band does not support Clive Palmer’s political party and are seeking legal advice over use of their song, “We’re Not Gonna Take It” for political advertising.

Michaela Whitbourn reported today that, “Clive Palmer has refused to admit he exerts “palpable control” over the political party he founded, as he defends a copyright infringement case brought against him by US metal band Twisted Sister over its hit We’re Not Gonna Take It.Clive Palmer insists he’s in the clear in copyright spat with Twisted Sister.

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Standing with a nervous nation that still believes

Margo Kingston comments, “We await the people’s verdict on May 18, but I’m panicking.” Standing with a nervous nation that still believes.

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Follow up to yesterday’s negative gearing discussion

Yesterday, there was a disagreement over the impact of Labor’s negative gearing policy on the property market. It had been implied that journalist, Samantha Maiden, had “taken out of context” a response from SQM Research on a negative gearing report. You can skip back to that here, Scott Morrison campaigns in Corangamite on housing.

Today, Ms Maiden was at the National Press Club (NPC) to ask Prime Minister Scott Morrison if he had made any changes to negative gearing himself when he was treasurer and if he costed those.

Scott Morrison confirms changes to negative gearing allowable deductions in his 2017-18 budget.

It comes as home loaner Yellow Brick Road founder and Celebrity Apprentice Australia host, Mark Bouris, used robocall to campaign against Labor’s changes to negative gearing. However, he appears to have breached regulations by not authorising them.

Christopher Knaus reported, “Prominent businessman Mark Bouris has breached electoral laws by robo-calling voters to warn them against voting for Labor, the electoral watchdog said on Thursday.” Mark Bouris robocalls on Labor’s negative gearing policy break election laws.

Mr Bouris defended his robocalls today. James Hall reported, “I don’t need authorisation because I’m not acting for Yellow Brick Road, I’m doing it on my own behalf,” the businessman says.” Mark Bouris defends robocall after electoral watchdog says he breached voting law.

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Campbell Newman sized cuts to hit federal public service

After Prime Minister Scott Morrison delivered his final pitch at the National Press Club (NPC), Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Finance Minister Mathias Cormann emerged to announce election costings. Revealed were $1.5b worth of cuts to public services to meet election promises. Their announcement also corresponded to the election advertising blackout period.

Paul Karp reported, “The Coalition has announced a further $1.5bn in cuts to the public service to pay for the $1.4bn in election promises made since the budget.” Coalition plans fresh $1.5bn public service cuts to fund election promises.

After promising their jobs were safe before the election, Queensland premier Campbell Newman famously cut 14,000 workers from the Queensland public service. 14,000 jobs to go but no sackings: Newman.

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Senator Bridget McKenzie sees climate action hoax

Wayne Jansson reported, “At pre-poll in Wangaratta on Saturday, Senator Bridget McKenzie refused to provide the cost to our economy of not taking swift and decisive action against climate change.” Nat senator sees ‘great hoax’ in climate action.

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Scott Morrison gives final pitch at NPC

Prime Minister Scott Morrison visited the Sydney markets before heading to Canberra for his final National Press Club address.

Scott Morrison visits markets in Sydney ahead of his National Press Club address.

PM Morrison empowered voters with an important choice on Saturday.

Scott Morrison delivers final major speech at the NPC in Canberra.

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Bill Shorten rallies with a “vote for change” speech

Opposition leader Bill Shorten spent the morning in the Liberal-held seat of Reid before traveling to Blacktown in Sydney’s west.

Bill Shorten campaigns in Reid ahead of his rally in Blacktown.

Mr Shorten rallied with a “vote for change” speech in Blacktown where Gough Whitlam gave his “it’s time for change” speech ahead of the 1972 election.

Bill Shorten rallies in Blacktown with a “vote for change” push.

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Australia’s combative political history over climate change policy

Data suggests that action on the environment has reached its highest ever level as an election issue, with 68 per cent of respondents to ABC Vote Compass agreeing with the government putting a price on carbon, up from 46pc in 2013.

Ashleigh Raper reported, “Australia has a long and complicated history climate change policy. It’s highly partisan and politically fraught. That’s especially true when it comes to a carbon tax.”

Action on the environment a much higher issue than in previous elections.

While the Coalition continues to fully support new coal mines, the Greens want a ban on new thermal ones and Labor is happy to sit in the middle lane. The latter two parties have developed a ‘Just Transition’ policy which aims to help workers and communities migrate to the renewable energy industry.

Paul Karp reported, “The Greens would demand $1bn to help workers and communities transition away from coal mining, export and power production, making a shift to renewable energy jobs central to climate negotiations with Labor.” Greens would demand $1bn fund from Labor for ‘just transition’ of coal workers.

Meanwhile in the South Pacific, some leaders of nations at threat of rising sea levels want the Coalition out of government so that proper climate change policies from Australia can be implemented.

Samoa prefers Coalition out of office over climate change policy.

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Coalition agreement breached

Senator Jim Molan is campaigning for senate re-election with a below-the-line how-to-vote (HTV) card which is against the official Liberal Party HTV. Barnaby Joyce claims this breaches the Coalition agreement between the Nationals and the Liberal Party. Mr Joyce said it was not a personal attack on Mr Molan but the National Party needed to stand up for its end of the agreement. He warned the rebels, “Your result will be ashes in your mouth.”

Malcolm Farr, “Liberals are bitterly divided over a rebel conservatives’ bid to claim a Senate spot in NSW and today the Nationals joined the unrest by warning the Coalition vote was being fractured.” Barnaby Joyce weighs into Liberal Party Senate stoush.

Barnaby Joyce says Jim Molan’s actions breach the Coalition agreement.

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